edmcgon

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About edmcgon

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  • Birthday 01/08/1965

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  1. This was THE best Trek film ever, for four reasons: First, the acting was top-notch across the entire cast. I'll take Pine over Shatner any day of the week and Sunday, and Quinto was at the very least equal to the role of Spock (although I thought he was a tiny bit better than Nimoy in TOS). Second, the humor in this movie worked perfectly. While it did include some inside jokes for Trek fans, it also included humor that anyone could get. Third, the movie didn't let up from beginning to end. Even the exposition parts were entertaining. Fourth, this was not JUST a Trek movie. This was a movie anyone can enjoy. Too often in the past, Trek films have gotten bogged down in trying to go out of their way to appeal to a mainstream audience. This one just flowed. The old good movie review cliche, "I laughed, I cried, it became a part of me", applies perfectly to this movie. I give it 5 stars, 2 thumbs up, and my money to see Star Trek 12.
  2. One intriguing thing about this episode: Other than the Q and some of the more "supernatural" races presented within Star Trek canon, the Voth race is arguably the most technologically advanced race ever presented in Trek lore.
  3. Stephen, that may be true. However, I grew up on TOS, and I plan to keep an open mind to this. If the movie is good, and if the actors do a good job, I can accept they aren't the originals. Although I personally think Zachary Quinto was born to play Spock.
  4. Just thought I'd pop in and share a rather glowing review of the new Trek film with all of you: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/revie...Trek-movie.html If the movie is half as good as the reviewer makes it sound, it'll be a blast!
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  6. First, Quincy is a boob, and has been since his days at UGA. All the talent in the world but severely lacking above the neck. Second, kudos to Bill Parcells. This sends the right message to the team. No matter who you are, if you screw up big two times, and you're gone. Third, kudos to Jerry Jones. He had a lot of pride invested in his Quincy Carter pick of several years ago. For those of you who don't remember, Jones drafted Carter in the 2nd round, even though many experts and league personnel people had expected Carter to go much later in the draft. For Jones to swallow his pride and drop Carter is an incredible act for him. And the right thing to do. More teams should follow the Cowboys' example on this one.
  7. I'm psyched! :) I can officially be called a football "fanatic". How many people do you know who have built a database for fantasy football? While I don't have any Super Bowl predictions yet, some teams to watch in the upcoming season: Cardinals: While still missing a defense, I expect Dennis Green will turn their offense around. I would be surprised to see them make the playoffs, but a .500 season is not out of the question. Bengals: This team will make the playoffs. Marvin Lewis is one of the finest coaches in the NFL. If Carson Palmer turns out to be a half-decent QB, a Super Bowl run is possible. Texans: This team looks playoff-bound. All the pieces are in place. Considering Dom Capers' history with Carolina, this could be a very good year for Houston. Falcons: The only question mark here is Michael Vick. If he stays healthy, this team will go far. Patriots: Just a gut feeling, but I don't see this team repeating the success of last year. On paper, there is no reason they can't, but it is just too hard to repeat a Super Bowl victory. Raiders: My favorite team is doomed by Norv Turner. I would love to see him turn them around, but I am NOT betting on it. :) Lions: Boom or bust. Bill Walsh has said the 3rd year is the one where you can tell if a QB is going to learn the West Coast offense, and this is Joey Harrington's 3rd year. With Charles Rogers, Roy Williams, and Tai Streets, Harrington has all the tools to make this offense go. However, the running game is a question mark with rookie Kevin Jones (although considering Bill Walsh won his first Super Bowl with a starting RB by the name of Ricky Patton, the West Coast offense can win without a stellar RB). Seahawks: If Koren Robinson can get his head on straight and give Matt Hasselbeck another good WR, this team could be destined for greatness. Otherwise, expect a playoff appearance and not much else. Chiefs: Never underestimate (Please stop me from cursing) Vermeil, although I don't see how they have improved from last year. A lot of offense, not much defense. Cowboys: Bill Parcells is THE best coach in the NFL. Period. This team will do very well. Adding Eddie George (who may have the best work ethic of any RB in the NFL) should help rookie RB Julius Jones in the long run. Eagles: I may be wrong, but I just cannot see TO improving this offense that much. He is a cancer in the locker room. Another loss in the NFC Championship looms. (sorry VBG) Redskins: Joe Gibbs. Clinton Portis. Now all they need is an offensive line. BTW, I also think Gibbs is making a mistake not starting Patrick Ramsey. I thought Ramsey was poised for greatness last year. Mark Brunell, who I have tons of respect for, is near the bottom of the hill on the downside of his career. Panthers: No major upgrades over last year, but they are still good. If they stay healthy, they should still do well. Jaguars: Watch Byron Leftwich. Last year, he was the best starting rookie QB I have seen in many years. This guy is going to be a GREAT QB for many years to come. :)
  8. From SI.com: Can anyone say they are truly surprised by this? :) The Dolphins' season has just officially ended. I wonder if Dave Wannstadt has his resume updated yet?
  9. I might give Price the vote on reputation, but the one who really gives me the creeps is Donald Sutherland. He is just scary evil.
  10. I agree with Jeanway and TUH that the internet is a big cause of the decline in reading books. However, that is NOT necessarily a bad thing. Do you realize how many great works of literature can be found on the internet? For example, you could read the entire works of Mark Twain without ever cracking open a book. In addition, have you ever read any of the other fictional literature available on the internet? I am not talking about famous authors, just stories from regular people who write. While there is plenty of "trash", there are also some surprisingly good stories. And the stories are available in ANY genre you might want to read. For those of you not into fiction, there is plenty of excellent non-fiction. There are news sites, editorial sites, and plenty of informational sites on every topic under the sun (and some beyond the sun ). IMO, the internet is the best thing to happen to our culture since the invention of the printing press. If the internet makes books obsolete, I will not shed a tear.
  11. Just one favorite: the courtroom scene in "A Few Good Men". I never get tired of it.
  12. I saw it Thusday night. I would give it :spidy: :spidy: :spidy: :spidy: (out of 4). It is a classic. I agree with Roger Ebert's comment about it being the best superhero film of all time. This film has action, depth, emotion, a message, and even some humor. If you have not seen it, do NOT read the spoiler: Click for Spoiler: Random thoughts about the movie: The train scene is a classic. I literally found myself getting a little dizzy watching it. And the end of it was just heartwarming. Speaking of heartwarming, so was the speech by Aunt May to Peter where she tells him why we need heros. THIS was the true message of the movie, reinforced later by the train scene. The relationship between Peter and MJ was played perfectly. I loved the resolution at the end. Doc Ock (Alfred Molina) was a tremendous villain. VERY believable and NOT 2-dimensional. The battles between Spidey and Doc Ock are quite original and fun to watch. Actually, part of the beauty of this film is how much depth the characters do have. Tobey Maguire is a master of the "awkward silence". Kirsten Dunst builds on the character she built in the first movie. You can even sense that MJ will eventually have problems with Parker's dedication to his "calling", no matter what she says. Even Aunt May's character gets fleshed out. The funny thing is I never liked her character in the comic books. In this movie, she's great. I loved her "action" scene. :P The only 2-dimensional character is J. Jonah Jameson (J.K. Simmons), but it is fun to watch him "chew the scenery". He provides some good comic relief. I especially loved the part where he is "mourning" Spiderman's retirement, and then changes his tune when Spidey steals his costume. The Harry Osborne subplot builds well to the next movie. While I can't relate to Harry, he does remind me of people I have known. On the other hand, I can relate to Peter Parker. Watching him, I think "If I had super powers, my life would be just as screwed up as his." :P BTW, is there anyone left in New York who does NOT know Spiderman's secret identity? Sam Raimi continues to earn my respect as a director. Some good cameos by Cliff Robertson and William Dafoe. An especially good cameo by Bruce Campbell (does Raimi ever make a movie without Campbell?) as the usher at MJ's play. Did everyone else catch the cameo by Stan Lee?
  13. I would respectfully disagree with Mr. Raimi on this. Part of the comic's premise was that Peter Parker was a scientific genius. If anyone was smart enough, they could come up with something which may not occur to 3M. :spidy:
  14. TUH, good pun. (que sera sera, Doris Day)
  15. One thing I would like to add that seems to have been forgotten in many tributes to Reagan was the events leading up to his presidency. Many of these events had caused a great distrust in the government and the office of the president. Consider: 1. JFK's assassination followed by the Warren Commission. The assassination itself raised quite a few questions, but the Warren Commission Report, with its' "magic bullet" theory, raised even more questions about a possible government coverup. 2. The Vietnam War. Whether you approve of the war or not, it was so poorly handled that it certainly brought into question our government's ability to run a war. 3. Watergate. I cannot stress enough how much this hurt the credibility of the presidency. Following this scandal with the Ford and Carter administrations did not help at all. 4. Economic problems of the 70's. Inflation was out of control and everything the Ford and Carter administrations did failed. The oil embargo of '73 left a pall over the economy for many years afterwards. 5. Iranian hostage crisis. This was the last nail in the Carter administration's coffin. Just further evidence of ineffectiveness from the presidency. I am not trying to debate any of these issues. I am just pointing out their impact on the American collective psyche. We were very "down" on the government and, by extension, ourselves. In a democracy/republic, if our government fails, who is there to blame but ourselves? When Reagan came into office, there was great skepticism of him. Even the conservatives were skeptical, although they were willing to give him the benefit of the doubt. Two things were critical in Reagan's first term: First, the war in Grenada (1983) was successful. Granted, it was a "baby step" militarily speaking. But the fact it was successful restored confidence in our military. The later bombing of Libya (1986) helped to reinforce our confidence. Second, it took awhile, but Reagan finally got the economy humming by '84. After years of economic malaise, it was like a breath of fresh air. During the '84 election, when he asked if we were better off than 4 years ago, we all knew the answer was yes. And we were grateful to him for it. When he left office in '89, our confidence in government and the presidency had been restored. By extension, so was our confidence in ourselves.