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Mr.Picard

The Sir Patrick Stewart Topic

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Hi everyone,

 

since I'm doing this sort of topic thingy on a lot of other boards, I thought why not doing it here as well, here, the first English-speaking Trek message board I registered at when I became a Trek fan... wow, that was a long time ago...

 

Those of you who remember me probably also remember that I'm a huge fan of Sir Patrick Stewart. I try to know everything about him, which is proving to be a rather challenging task sometimes.

 

This topic is meant to provide people with Sir-Patrick-related news, new pictures and videos, movie/theater rumors and all (I will mark rumors as such, no worries). Of course it is also meant to be interactive, so, if you have a Sir-Patrick-related question or a comment or whatever, feel free to chime in and I'll try to answer it. I can't guarantee that I'll always have an answer, though. He is a rather fascinating individual with lots and lots of different aspects (which is partly why I like him so much), so, as I said, trying to know all about him is definitely not an easy task.

 

Anyways... to start this whole thing, I thought I'd provide you with a) a link that points to recent pictures of Sir Patrick AND b ) information about what he's up to at the moment.

 

a) The recent pictures can be found here. There were taken at OzTrek2, a Star Trek convention in Melbourne, Australia. Sir Patrick attended it on January 30th.

 

b ) Next week (on Feb 18-21) Sir Patrick is going to perform with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in their version of Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex. He won't sing, though, he'll "only" narrate. (Pity, isn't it?) More information can be found here. He has also hinted at the fact that he will be back on a theater stage soon, so, he's up to something in that regard as well.

 

 

Furthermore, if you have Twitter, you can follow my Sir-Patrick-News account over there at: http://twitter.com/PatStewartNews

VaBeachGuy likes this

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Of course, you're remembered. You're unforgettable, Mrs. Picard. Thanks for this info. I'm looking forward to following any updates you post.

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You are a most memorable Trek and Patrick Stewart fan here. What a great idea! Kudos for doing this. I did not realize that Patrick would be here in Chicago soon. Thanks for sharing that great news! Patrick news is always welcome!

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Of course, you're remembered. You're unforgettable, Mrs. Picard. Thanks for this info. I'm looking forward to following any updates you post.

 

Aww thanks Takara! I can't promise an update every week or something, though - he sometimes goes into hiding for a few weeks. :) But then there are times when there are so many news and updates that I don't even know where to begin... I sometimes think he does it on purpose. lol

 

 

You are a most memorable Trek and Patrick Stewart fan here. What a great idea! Kudos for doing this. I did not realize that Patrick would be here in Chicago soon. Thanks for sharing that great news! Patrick news is always welcome!

 

Thank you, trekz! Yes, he will be in Chicago next week. He said he'll spend almost the entire week there, I guess they have to rehearse properly and all. He's very excited about working with "some of the finest musicians", as he put it in a recent interview. This is coming from the man who had no idea who the Beatles were when he was in Liverpool when they were famous... (LOL)

 

He's also scheduled to show up at the Whatsonstage Theatergoers' Choice Awards in London on Sunday, he's a nominee, after all, he should show up, at least for a bit...

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Sir Patrick and Bill Shatner attended a Star Trek convention in San Francisco recently - and now someone has uploaded quite a bit of that appearance on Youtube. Check it out over

.

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Here's the latest rumor (I will treat it as such because the Daily Mail is NOT a reliable source)... I have, however, indeed heard of this somewhere else before, so, it MIGHT actually be true! ^^

 

 

 

 

Chichester Festival to Feature Patrick Stewart, Rupert Everett and Musical Love Story

 

 

Patrick Stewart will return to Chichester Festival's Minerva Theatre to appear in a new production of Edward Bond's 1973 play Bingo, due to premiere in April.

 

According to London's Daily Mail, other plans for the annual Chichester summer season include a new production of Pygmalion, starring Rupert Everett as Professor Higgins; a new musical version of the 1970 film "Love Story," scored by composer Howard Goodall with lyrics co-written by Stephen Clark; and a new stage production of 42nd Street. The theatre is due to make a formal announcement of the full season Feb. 18.

 

Stewart previously appeared at Chichester's Minerva Theatre in the title role of Rupert Goold's Macbeth in 2007, before that production transferred to the West End and subsequently Broadway. Stewart was last seen on stage in Waiting for Godot at the Theatre Royal, Haymarket last year.

 

Bingo, subtitled Scenes of Death and Money, is a fictional account of the retired William Shakespeare at his Warwickshire home in 1615 and 1616, suffering pangs of conscience in part because he signed a contract which protected his landholdings, on the condition that he would not interfere with an enclosure of common lands that would hurt the local peasant farmers. It will be directed by Angus Jackson, who has previously directed Funny Girl, The Waltz of the Toreadors, The Father and Carousel at Chichester.

 

 

(Source)

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I was lucky enough to see Patrick Stewart in 2007 at Chichester Festival portraying a grizzled Malvolio with a Scottish accent and kilt in Philip Franks' inventive main house staging of Twelfth Night. A great production and Patrick's performance was wonderful! (Macbeth was sold out) Chichester was a picturesque city. I later got Patrick's autograph at the Film and Comic Convention in London. Two highlights of a fun trip to England.

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I was lucky enough to see Patrick Stewart in 2007 at Chichester Festival portraying a grizzled Malvolio with a Scottish accent and kilt in Philip Franks' inventive main house staging of Twelfth Night. A great production and Patrick's performance was wonderful! (Macbeth was sold out) Chichester was a picturesque city. I later got Patrick's autograph at the Film and Comic Convention in London. Two highlights of a fun trip to England.

 

Oh yes the kilt in Twelfth Night - quite a few people have mentioned this one to me! I was incredibly happy when I finally found a picture! :) I'm glad you enjoyed his performance as Malvolio - he is a brilliant stage actor, no matter what, but he is truly at his best when he's in a Shakespeare play.

 

I won't be able to make it to Chichester (IF this rumor about him being in that play is true)... I don't have enough money. I did see him last year, so, I'm not that mad about it... but hey, it's always possible I win the lottery and end up going there after all... lol. Trips to England are somewhat expensive, unfortunately.

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Sir Patrick has just won a Whatsonstage Award for Best Supporting Actor In A Play for his role in Hamlet! :) Hamlet also won an award, as did Waiting For Godot (Theater Event Of The Year! Hehe. It is well-deserved, it was a great play, Sir Patrick was amazing!)

 

You can find the full winners list here.

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Sir Patrick has just won a Whatsonstage Award for Best Supporting Actor In A Play for his role in Hamlet! :) Hamlet also won an award, as did Waiting For Godot (Theater Event Of The Year! Hehe. It is well-deserved, it was a great play, Sir Patrick was amazing!)

 

You can find the full winners list here.

Excellent! Was Sir Patrick there to accept his award in person?

 

BTW I have tickets for a Chicago performance of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in their version of Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex with Patrick narrating! I will report ater seeing him next Friday! This is all he's doing in town I assume.

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Sir Patrick has just won a Whatsonstage Award for Best Supporting Actor In A Play for his role in Hamlet! :) Hamlet also won an award, as did Waiting For Godot (Theater Event Of The Year! Hehe. It is well-deserved, it was a great play, Sir Patrick was amazing!)

 

You can find the full winners list here.

Excellent! Was Sir Patrick there to accept his award in person?

 

BTW I have tickets for a Chicago performance of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra in their version of Stravinsky's Oedipus Rex with Patrick narrating! I will report ater seeing him next Friday! This is all he's doing in town I assume.

 

Yes, he was there, just as I had hoped he would be. It took them too long to publish the pictures last night, so I went to bed... (I mean I need to sleep at some point, I'd love to keep track of him for 24 hours a day, though! *lol*)

 

But here is one now, a picture of two happy award winners:

 

sirpatandsirian.png

 

Oooh I'm so happy to hear that you got tickets for the show in Chicago! It would be great if you could report about how he did and all! :) Maybe you'll get to see him at the stage door or something? If you do, greet him from me, yes? :clap: (just kidding!)

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More news AND the confirmation of the Chichester Festival rumor:

 

 

Star Trek star 'getting used to knighthood'

 

 

 

Actor Patrick Stewart says he is starting to feel more comfortable about being called "Sir" following his knighthood in the New Year's Honours. The star of stage and Star Trek was rewarded for his services to drama.

 

"I have only been in England for four days since 1 January so I've had time to acclimatize myself to this extraordinary honour," Sir Patrick told the BBC. He was speaking at the Whatsonstage.com theatre awards in London.

 

Sir Patrick was named best supporting actor in a play for the role of Claudius in Hamlet, in which he starred alongside David Tennant. He also took home the theatre event of the year award - sharing the prize with his X-Men co-star Sir Ian McKellen, for their stage partnership in Waiting For Godot.

 

On his knighthood, Sir Patrick said: "It's beginning to feel, day by day, a little more comfortable. But tonight to hear my name linked like that with Sir Ian McKellen was perhaps so far the highlight of this event."

 

Sir Patrick confirmed that he will be appearing in two 20th Century plays in 2010, the first of which will be Edward Bond's Bingo at Chichester's Minerva Theatre. The play, first performed in 1973, is a fictional account of the last days of William Shakespeare.

 

Sir Patrick said he had another as-yet-unannounced project in New York at the end of the year. Asked what other roles would interest him, he said: "There's a whole list of Shakespeare roles I have never played - Falstaff, Lear, Bottom - and some that I wouldn't mind looking at again."

 

(Source)

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Great picture with Sir Ian McKellen! I imagine it does take some adjustment to hearing yourself referred to as Sir Patrick! I wonder what the as-yet-unannounced project in New York at the end of the year will be??? I would love to see him play Falstaff, Lear, Bottom or any character by Shakespeare again! I will definitely report on his performance narrating Oedipus Rex this week.

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Great picture with Sir Ian McKellen! I imagine it does take some adjustment to hearing yourself referred to as Sir Patrick! I wonder what the as-yet-unannounced project in New York at the end of the year will be??? I would love to see him play Falstaff, Lear, Bottom or any character by Shakespeare again! I will definitely report on his performance narrating Oedipus Rex this week.

 

Yeah, I imagine it takes him quite some time, too... he never expected to be knighted, after all. (He's just too modest sometimes! :) )

 

I have no idea what that project in NYC is going to be - but I will keep looking for rumors and all. I'm interested in it as well, even though I definitely won't have the money to fly to the US and see it. It won't hurt to know what it's going to be about, though! lol

 

I'd love to see him as Lear, actually. Falstaff would be nice as well, but Lear is something I'd love even more.

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Here's a new interview with Sir Patrick in which he talks about his current "assignment" in Chicago:

 

 

CSO engages Patrick Stewart for 'Oedipus Rex'

 

 

 

“This has been the best time of my life,” says Sir Patrick Stewart, sizing up the last half decade spent in his native England. “For the past six years, I have worked almost exclusively in classical theater. After years of focusing on film and TV, I wanted to find my way back to the English classical stage.”

 

He certainly has. Since filling numerous signature roles in the Shakespeare canon, he’s earned himself the rarefied honor of knighthood. He’s also renovated his dream home in Oxfordshire, something he’s long wished for since his days on the Starship Enterprise. Yet he’ll be back on American television in no time: In April, the noted Shakespearean actor will appear on PBS in film adaptations of “Macbeth” and Hamlet.”

 

Here in Chicago, Stewart, 69, is using his seductive dramatic baritone to narrate Stravinsky’s opera-oratorio “Oedipus Rex,” in performances through Sunday at Symphony Center with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

 

We caught up with Stewart via phone earlier this week:

 

Q. You narrated “Peter and the Wolf” for a recording in 1994. So what keeps bringing you back to filling this unusual niche called classical music narration?

 

A. I do not play an instrument. I sing a little, but I really have no musical skills. But music is a very important part of my life, and I listen throughout the day constantly. A lot of what I listen to is classical music. To be placed in the middle of a great orchestra like Chicago for a few days, and to be almost in the position in which I remember Andre Previn called the “best seat in the house where the conductor stands,” is for me irresistible.

 

This afternoon I’m going to be in a rehearsal with some of the grandest orchestral players in the world and to be up close like that is going to be a huge thrill. So I do this for the thrill of being close to great musicians.

 

Q. So how differently do you approach “Oedipus Rex” than, say, a children’s work like “Peter and the Wolf”?

 

A. Everything is determined by the kind of music, the kind of language, the nature of narrative. “Peter and the Wolf” is colorful and witty and almost mockingly melodramatic. “Oedipus Rex” is high tragedy, in which oracles are consulted and tragic events occur for the principal characters. So the tone and quality of voice that I will be using on “Oedipus” will be utterly different from the lighter and humorous “Peter.”

 

Q. How was music a part of your childhood?

 

A. It wasn’t. I grew up in a household that was really quite poor. We had no music, and there were no books. I came to music late in my life. Luckily, Shakespeare and drama were introduced to me by a wonderful English teacher when I was 12. Music came much later.

 

Q. Describe how it did.

 

A. There was for me a growing awareness that there was a world of beauty, and this excitement slowly crept up on me. And then I began to attend concerts. I came from a part of England where there were a lot of amateur orchestras. In my early 20s, I began to watch opera. Although my opera experiences, ironically, really took off when I went to L.A. When I was in Hollywood filming “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” the director of the L.A. Opera was an Englishman, Peter Hemmings, and he told me to come see one of his operas. It was escapism from the rigors of shooting a television drama series week after week.

 

Q. Since moving back to the U.K., what has been your proudest professional moment?

 

A. The high point of it has been a 22-week run of Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” with Ian McKellen at the Haymarket Theater in London.

 

(Source)

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Yesterday I attended an afternoon performance of The Chicago Symphony orchestra featuring Stravinsky, ending with the opera oratorio "Oedipus Rex" with narration by Sir Patrick Stewart. While well attended, it was not a full house.

 

The conductor was Michael Tilson Thomas, music director of the San Francisco Symphony and principal guest conductor of the London Symphony Orchestra, who knew Stravinsky. Pieces performed before Oedipus REx included a 1943 "Ode" and

the 1928-29 ballet "Apollon musagete."

 

The performance was impressive to me, with four guest singers, the men of the Chicago Symphony Chorus and, of course, Patrick Stewart. While the Sun Times reviewer thought Patrick was almost too helpful to the audience, I appreciated his narration greatly. Patrick performed six separate parts of narration in a dramatic style. I enjoyed his performance and that of the CSO, male chorus, and guest performers immensely!

 

Below is the text of an article which appeared in the Chicago Sun Times today, February 20:

 

CSO engages Patrick Stewart for 'Oedipus Rex'

Comments

 

February 18, 2010

 

BY BRYANT MANNING

“This has been the best time of my life,” says Sir Patrick Stewart, sizing up the last half decade spent in his native England. “For the past six years, I have worked almost exclusively in classical theater. After years of focusing on film and TV, I wanted to find my way back to the English classical stage.”

 

He certainly has. Since filling numerous signature roles in the Shakespeare canon, he’s earned himself the rarefied honor of knighthood. He’s also renovated his dream home in Oxfordshire, something he’s long wished for since his days on the Starship Enterprise. Yet he’ll be back on American television in no time: In April, the noted Shakespearean actor will appear on PBS in film adaptations of “Macbeth” and Hamlet.”

 

Here in Chicago, Stewart, 69, is using his seductive dramatic baritone to narrate Stravinsky’s opera-oratorio “Oedipus Rex,” in performances through Sunday at Symphony Center with conductor Michael Tilson Thomas and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

 

We caught up with Stewart via phone earlier this week:

 

Q. You narrated “Peter and the Wolf” for a recording in 1994. So what keeps bringing you back to filling this unusual niche called classical music narration?

 

A. I do not play an instrument. I sing a little, but I really have no musical skills. But music is a very important part of my life, and I listen throughout the day constantly. A lot of what I listen to is classical music. To be placed in the middle of a great orchestra like Chicago for a few days, and to be almost in the position in which I remember Andre Previn called the “best seat in the house where the conductor stands,” is for me irresistible.

 

This afternoon I’m going to be in a rehearsal with some of the grandest orchestral players in the world and to be up close like that is going to be a huge thrill. So I do this for the thrill of being close to great musicians.

 

Q. So how differently do you approach “Oedipus Rex” than, say, a children’s work like “Peter and the Wolf”?

 

A. Everything is determined by the kind of music, the kind of language, the nature of narrative. “Peter and the Wolf” is colorful and witty and almost mockingly melodramatic. “Oedipus Rex” is high tragedy, in which oracles are consulted and tragic events occur for the principal characters. So the tone and quality of voice that I will be using on “Oedipus” will be utterly different from the lighter and humorous “Peter.”

 

Q. How was music a part of your childhood?

 

A. It wasn’t. I grew up in a household that was really quite poor. We had no music, and there were no books. I came to music late in my life. Luckily, Shakespeare and drama were introduced to me by a wonderful English teacher when I was 12. Music came much later.

 

Q. Describe how it did.

 

A. There was for me a growing awareness that there was a world of beauty, and this excitement slowly crept up on me. And then I began to attend concerts. I came from a part of England where there were a lot of amateur orchestras. In my early 20s, I began to watch opera. Although my opera experiences, ironically, really took off when I went to L.A. When I was in Hollywood filming “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” the director of the L.A. Opera was an Englishman, Peter Hemmings, and he told me to come see one of his operas. It was escapism from the rigors of shooting a television drama series week after week.

 

Q. Since moving back to the U.K., what has been your proudest professional moment?

 

A. The high point of it has been a 22-week run of Samuel Beckett’s “Waiting for Godot” with Ian McKellen at the Haymarket Theater in London.

 

Bryant Manning is a Chicago freelance writer and critic.

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Thanks for the report, trekz!!! (Although I did post the interview already above, but 'tis fine! :clap: )

 

I'm glad you enjoyed the show! He's a fantastic narrator (I own his Peter And The Wolf narration, and I don't even really care for classical music), so, I had no doubt that he'd be doing a great job with the CSO as well! I'm so happy that you liked it and that you got to see him live on stage! :clap:

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And more work and more honors, of course...

 

 

Sir Patrick Stewart OBE Named Huddersfield Town Academy President

 

hudl.png

 

 

Huddersfield Town is proud to announce that worldwide film, stage and television superstar Sir Patrick Stewart OBE has become President of the Academy.

 

Stewart is best known for his roles as Jean-Luc Picard in Star Trek: The Next Generation and Professor Charles Xavier in the X-Men films and is also Chancellor of the University of Huddersfield; a role in which he presented Club Ambassador Andy Booth with his honorary fellowship recently.

 

A diehard Town fan, Mirfield-born Patrick – who was recently knighted in the Queen’s New Year’s honours list for his services to drama – will help the Club raise the profile of its youth system.

 

His role is a new one at the Club and Commercial Director Sean Jarvis explained that the Olivier Award winner can play a vital role in the continued progression of the Academy.

 

“It is fantastic news that someone with the profile of Sir Patrick Stewart is getting officially involved with the Huddersfield Town Academy. Patrick has terrific passion for the football club and will act as a figurehead for the Academy as it builds for a bigger future.

 

“Everyone at the Club is honoured that Sir Patrick has accepted the role and we are looking forward to working with him.”

 

Academy Manager Graham Mitchell echoed Sean’s comments.

 

“One of the primary objectives of my job is to continue the development and growth of our already successful Academy and having Mr. Stewart on board as President will be a massive tool for us in terms of attracting sponsorship and raising our profile in the local and wider communities.”

 

Huddersfield Town Chief Executive Nigel Clibbens welcomed Sir Patrick to the Club.

 

“We are delighted to have Sir Patrick on board with us in an official capacity. He has been kind enough to help out the Club on several occasions already, with our season ticket campaign ahead of the current season for example and with the Yorkshire Air Ambulance ‘Keep It Up’ campaign, and we are looking forward to harnessing his drive and passion for the Club to further the Academy.”

 

(Source)

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Sir Patrick has written a rather interesting article:

 

 

The academy trek: a transformative journey into a world of potential (Sir Patrick Stewart describes the delights of higher education, the dangers it faces and how Huddersfield lured him home.)

 

 

 

 

After a long period of my life spent in the US, I began to think of a permanent return to England.

 

It happened eventually and the result would mark a rewarding new chapter in my acting career. But I needed a special spark to make me relocate again. It came from a university, which may seem unusual in view of my life story.

 

I suppose my own higher education took place with the Royal Shakespeare Company. After secondary modern schooling in West Yorkshire and a rather chequered and short-lived stint as a cub reporter on a local paper, I managed to break into repertory theatre in the late 1950s.

 

After seven years I made it to the RSC and stayed with the company for 14 years. It was my life and my passion. The company provided a superb theatrical education, as well as giving me the opportunity to mix with clever, highly educated colleagues and creative people from cultures all around the world.

 

While in the US, I was co-director of Acter: A Center for Creative Theater, Education and Research, based at the University of California, Santa Barbara, but had little contact with the world of education in the UK. So it came as rather a surprise when, in 2004, I was asked if I would consider becoming chancellor of the University of Huddersfield. The answer was yes, I would be delighted - but I wanted to be rather more than a figurehead who showed up once a year, donned the ceremonial robes and handed out certificates. I wanted to be as closely involved with the university and its development as time would permit.

 

And it was this prospect that helped me to make up my mind and move back to the UK. I had a career and property in the US, but I wanted to go home. In terms of my artistic development, it would prove to be an excellent move. I believe my experience stands as a metaphor for the transformative power of university education.

 

My own journey took me back across the Atlantic and towards a new phase in my stage career. At universities such as Huddersfield, students make a journey into their own potential. It is vital, not only for them but for the country as a whole, that as many people as possible take this road.

 

My involvement with the University of Huddersfield has worked out just as I hoped. I am proud to be thought of as a hands-on chancellor - and to have been appointed professor of performing arts. I am proud of the way that the university, with its deep roots in local industry and technical education, has expanded both in terms of student numbers - they stand at a record 24,000 - and the range of its research.

 

Huddersfield's campus is an exciting place to be. The range and quality of teaching and research - from science, engineering, health, social work and business to the humanities, music and drama - are a constant inspiration. The students and staff I meet here are making a difference to our future.

 

But the future of higher education itself is uncertain. It is fortunate that Huddersfield has placed itself on a sound financial footing, but we cannot expect immunity from the effects of government cutbacks.

 

Every sector of the economy faced with retrenchment will make a case for the impact to be minimised. Universities are no exception. Is it special pleading? I hardly think so. A reversal in the expansion and quality of higher education in the UK would have serious implications for individuals, for organisations, for the future of our country.

 

At Huddersfield, but at dozens of other universities as well, research is taking place that will create and develop the new technologies, industries and economic activity that we desperately need. The graduates who will nurture and develop those industries are vital for our future prosperity.

 

I am proud to be involved closely with one of our universities. The UK should be proud of and jealously guard its university sector as a whole.

 

 

(Source)

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I so glad I had a chance to meet him. I rarely do events like these but this was a one time chance for me. I actually got to talk to him!

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Well he is a rather charming fellow, I agree. :clap: I've talked to him briefly twice and it was a wonderful experience each time.

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Does this mean he has retired from acting?

 

Oh no, definitely not. I doubt he'll EVER retire from acting. It's the most important thing in his life, after all. It's what makes him happy like nothing else can. ^^ He'll be back on stage in April, actually. He just happens to also be a professor at the University of Huddersfield and the university's chancellor. He's quite the multitasking guy. :clap:

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I'd ordered a behind-the-scenes documentary DVD called Theatreland on Tuesday and got it and watched it yesterday and today - it's a loooong documentary that was filmed throughout the entire run of Waiting For Godot in London. There's lots of backstage Sir Patrick and Sir Ian, lots of details, lots of theater language, lots of humor... basically, it shows how a theatrical production comes to life and all. I highly recommend it to everyone who is interested in either theater or Sir Patrick or both.

 

I took a few screencaps:

 

theatreland13.png

 

theatreland8.png

 

theatreland4.png

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Sir Patrick was a guest at The One (BBC) yesterday. I couldn't watch it since I don't live in the UK (humph, it's not my fault that I live where I live), but I did find this little piece of information, and friends from the UK have told me that he did indeed talk about this:

 

Stewart's Shock At Knighthood

 

 

British actor SIR PATRICK STEWART would like to relive the moment he learned of his knighthood - and not open the official letter informing him of the high honour in a hotel room on his own.

 

The 69-year-old thespian was saluted for his 50-year acting career in Queen Elizabeth II's New Year's Honours list at the beginning of 2010 - but he mistakenly took the correspondence on location with him last year (09), while he was shooting MACbeth.

 

And he forgot about it for four days.

 

He confesses, "I was on location in North Nottinghamshire. We were filming MACbeth and I'd brought a big envelope from my agent and put it in a closet and left it there for three or four days.

 

"I was leaving early one morning and thought, 'I've got five minutes', and started going through stuff and there it was. (I was) sitting in this all-brown hotel room at about quarter past six on a November morning when I saw it.

 

"The frustrating thing was we were shooting a big scene that day with most of the cast and what I wanted to do was rush on the set and go, 'Guys, you'll never believe what has happened!' but of course I couldn't."

 

The former Star Trek captain insists the new title hasn't gone to his head: "I do not insist on it, not at all - but if you care to (use it) I won't protest. I'm delighted and thrilled and never thought something like this would happen to me."

 

(Source)

 

 

Aaaand then there's this little rumor. It has NOT yet been confirmed, though!

 

 

Acclaimed Tony Award nominated actor Sir Patrick Stewart will return to Broadway in David Mamet's 'A Life in the Theatre'. Stewart will portray the lead character of 'Robert', a role he previously played in the 2005 production at London's Apollo Theatre. 'A Life in the Theatre' will be directed by Neil Pepe. Additional cast will be announced at a later date.

 

(Source)

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