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Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan

What rating would you give ST II: "The Wrath of Khan"?   20 members have voted

  1. 1. What rating would you give ST II: "The Wrath of Khan"?

    • 5. It's great, I loved it!
      16
    • 4. It's good
      2
    • 3. It's average
      1
    • 2. It's not that good
      0
    • 1. I hated it!
      1

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18 posts in this topic

PRODUCTION NUMBER: 002

ORIGINAL RELEASE DATE: 06.04.1982

SPECIAL EDITION RELEASE: 08.06.2002

STARDATE: 8130.4

 

Technology:

Genesis Device

phaser type-2

transporter

warp drive

 

Place:

Earth

 

Alien:

Vulcans

 

Ships:

Enterprise, U.S.S.

Reliant, U.S.S.

 

Characters:

Captain Clark Terrell

Dr. Carol Marcus

Dr. David Marcus

Hikaru Sulu

James T. Kirk

Khan Noonien Singh

Leonard H. McCoy

Pavel Chekov

Saavik

Spock

Uhura

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I voted this one a four, because I could not vote for 4 1/2. This one actually ranks just below TVH, for me. It is a very well written film, and the storyline is very good. True I know there are arguments that this is the film that Nemesis echoes... and I can see parallels, but I still will feel that they are similar yet different stories.

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1

 

I didn't like this movie. Khan was just too overconfident. He drove his revenge with anger which isn't a good story. He needed some passion and some smarts.

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5

 

Its great I love it, This trek is known as the best of the original series throughout Hollywood with excellent acting....Kahhhhhnnnn!!!! that line has made it into Pop culture alone

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Great special effects and a great continuation of Space Seed.

 

The one thing I do not like is the captain of the Reliant. From the point you meet him he is just not act as a I think a captain would he seems unsure of himself.

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Star Trek II:The Wrath Of Khan

---------------------------------------

 

It gets a 5 from me!

 

 

:) :( :( :P

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Gave it a 4. I actually thought the storyline was plausible and the explanations relatively solid. I kept forgetting about the Genesis having an overpowering matrix, but once you're able to keep that in mind, it goes smoothly. Hard to imagine Scotty still being Chief Engineer, even though you know that an engineer was all he wanted to do. Still, seeing him there was a slight shock, even if Spock was in command. Great special effects, nice jobs from acting, including the running gags. One thing I caught right away though was with Chekhov. Khan appeared in Season 1 of Star Trek, before Chekhov, but Pavel was even able to recognize Khan; and Khan, Chekhov. Still, worth watching overall.

Edited by youbroughtheryouRiker

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Best Trek movie.........EVER!..... :yahoo:

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:yahoo: Its great..i loved it and its also my fav trek film and imo the best of all the trek films,also the very first trek film i saw and it was with my uncle :)

 

"I digitaly added jabba the hutt into the original star wars...what ever i do what i want!!"....cartman

Edited by hangon

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By far, the very best Trek Movie ever made (to date).

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:rockon: For me the best because not only was it very good, it follow the series perfectly. I felt just like I did that Thursday night when the first episode came on :rockon:

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I gave it a 1. IMO, it was too drawn out and the parallels between this film and the literary works of Melville and

Milton would be better viewed in the classic eps "Space Seed" and "The Doomsday Machine".

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A great movie, but I don't like the Saavik in this movie. Yeah she's hot, but way too emotional to be a Vulcan. Robin Curtis IS Saavik in my book, her portrayal of the character was over seen by Leonard every step of the way. True, it is more to do with Saavik in the script, but Robin just did better in my opinion

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A great movie, but I don't like the Saavik in this movie. Yeah she's hot, but way too emotional to be a Vulcan. Robin Curtis IS Saavik in my book, her portrayal of the character was over seen by Leonard every step of the way. True, it is more to do with Saavik in the script, but Robin just did better in my opinion

Well, she was supposed to be half Vulcan and half Romulan. Her display of emotion made perfect sense to me.

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I agree, the script was definitely written with that in mind, but it was never established on the movies. It makes me think it is less likely since she has no real emotion on the next two films

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I liked this movie. It was an awsome battle between two federation starships. It also marked the first apperance of a new Federation starship not of the Constitution class.

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My favorite Star Trek film, and the film the saved the franchise imo. Some trivia:

 

The film was much more action-oriented than its predecessor, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, but Star Trek II was much less costly to make, with a modest special effects budget and TV production schedule. Indeed, the project was supervised not by Paramount's theatrical division, but by its television unit, and produced by Harve Bennett, a respected TV veteran (The Six Million Dollar Man, The Bionic Woman, and the miniseries Rich Man, Poor Man). Bennett produced the next three films in the series as well, and appeared in a cameo as Admiral Robert Bennett in his series valedictory Star Trek V: The Final Frontier.

 

At a budget of US$11,000,000 in 1982 dollars (approximately US$23,000,000 in 2006 dollars), as of 2006 Star Trek:II was the cheapest Star Trek motion picture to have been made to date, which was due to requirements placed on the production given the cost overruns of its predecessor Star Trek: The Motion Picture. Star Trek II is still the cheapest even when one adjusts for inflation; most of the film was shot on the same set, as the bridge of the Reliant was a redress of the Enterprise’s bridge and the "bridge simulator" (from the opening scene) was a simple reuse of that set.

 

Star Trek II re-used many models from the first film, including the three Klingon battle cruisers in each movie's opening scene. Also it used the same shots of the docked Enterprise that were used in Star Trek: The Motion Picture, but these shots were greatly shortened. Nevertheless, Star Trek II owes its considerable success to being primarily a character vehicle. By any reasonable account, Star Trek II rescued the Star Trek franchise.[original research?]

 

The James Horner score is markedly different from Jerry Goldsmith's score for the Star Trek: The Motion Picture, switching from Goldsmith's dark, heavy themes to a sound evocative of seafaring and swashbuckling. A portion of the score draws heavily on Sergei Prokofiev's "Battle on the Ice" from the score for the movie Alexander Nevsky[citation needed]. The opening and closing titles also feature the return of Alexander Courage's well-known Star Trek theme (which was only used briefly by Goldsmith), and the voiceover from the original series ("Space... the final frontier..."), this time read by Leonard Nimoy before the closing credits roll. This was Horner's first major film score, and musical cues from it appear in many of his later projects, including Cocoon and Aliens. Despite the differences, Horner did borrow one signature sound from Goldsmith's earlier soundtrack: a very deep string tone (produced by the "blaster beam"), used to accentuate moments of tension and danger.

 

The engine warpcore of the refit USS Enterprise was later reused in the engine room of the USS Voyager on Star Trek: Voyager.

 

Expectations and critical reception:

It is the first Star Trek episode or movie where damage to the outer hull of the Enterprise is seen (and incidentally also the only TOS film in which we see a ship fire its phasers.) TWOK is the only Star Trek film where the antagonists are all human, albeit they are for the most part genetically-engineered supermen.

 

During filming, rumors abounded among fans that Spock would die (it is speculated in Shatner's memoir that the primary lifegiver to these rumors was Gene Roddenberry). Meyer didn't want this expectation to overshadow the rest of the film, so he scripted Spock's "death" in the first scene - the character pretends to be dead in a training exercise, slumping against a wall - so as to mislead viewers into being surprised at the film's ending. After the first scene, as Kirk and Spock left the training facility, Kirk quipped, "Aren't you dead?" Originally, Spock's death was supposed to be permanent, as Nimoy no longer wished to appear in future sequels. But as Nimoy has said, he changed his mind after his good experiences during filming, hence the mind-meld with McCoy before he goes to certain death in the engine room, and Kirk's musing that he must return to Genesis. Nicholas Meyer did not contribute to the scenes in which Spock's tube is visible on Genesis as it was his intention that Spock's death be irrevocable.

 

The film introduces Star Trek fans to the "red jacket" uniform (a red double-breasted tunic over a color-coded turtleneck shirt), widely regarded as one of the most popular and attractive Star Trek costumes in comparison to the colored shirts and tunics of the original series and The Next Generation.[citation needed] In addition, the fictional history of Star Trek indicates that the uniform seen in Star Trek II, adopted sometime between the events of The Motion Picture and The Wrath of Khan, was one of the longest issued uniforms of Starfleet, lasting well into the 24th century. (Later versions of this uniform, as glimpsed at in several TNG episodes, would see the turtlenecks replaced by crewneck shirts and the belt eliminated.)

 

Character and actor notes:

Kirk and Shatner

Nicholas Meyer reported on the DVD that he did endless takes with William Shatner so that Shatner would get tired of doing his usual overblown performance as Kirk and fall into a more natural performance.

 

Among the "antiques" visible in Kirk's San Francisco apartment is an ancient home computer that is recognizably (based on the trapezoidal shape of its monitor) a Commodore PET. At the time Star Trek II was filmed, Shatner was the celebrity pitchman for Commodore computers. (In the DVD commentary for the Director's Edition, the computer is pointed out but referred to as a Commodore 64.)

 

Khan and Montalban

Admiral James T. Kirk (William Shatner) and Khan Noonien Singh (Ricardo Montalban) were never actually face-to-face at any point during the film. All of their interactions are over the viewscreen or through communicators. Shatner describes in his book Star Trek Movie Memories (ISBN 0-06-017617-2) how their scenes were filmed four months apart.

 

It was reported that Montalban took a substantial pay cut to reprise his role of Khan, because he enjoyed playing the character so much.[citation needed]

 

In the original series episode "Space Seed", Khan was described in dialog as being the result of a "selective breeding" program. However, in the movie, Chekov described Khan as being "the product of 20th century genetic engineering." (However, this could be much the same thing as it happened during the Eugenics Wars in the early 1990s in the Star Trek Universe, and given the dialog between McCoy and Spock, it showed that attempts were made to improve the human race through selective breeding and genetics).

 

Khan and Chekov both recognize each other during their initial encounter in the film, despite the fact that Chekov did not appear in the "Space Seed." (Koenig had not yet joined the TV series at the time.) While it is possible that Chekov learned of the earlier incident with Khan from the other Enterprise crew members, no explanation is given for why Khan knows Chekov. It has been suggested that Chekov was already a member of the crew, but not yet a bridge officer. In reality it was a simple oversight by the filmmakers. Meyer justifies it in the DVD audiocommentary by noting that Arthur Conan Doyle made similar oversights in his Sherlock Holmes stories.

 

Others

During the funeral scene for Spock, it was originally intended that the piped version of "Amazing Grace" be continued into the exterior shot, but the choice was made in post-production to switch to an orchestrated version after the scene left the torpedo room.

 

The film features a cameo of Transporter Chief Kyle (John Winston) from The Original Series. Kyle is now a Lieutenant Commander and serving as Communications Officer aboard the USS Reliant.

 

The film is notable for being the first major role for Kirstie Alley, who played Lieutenant Saavik. The character of Saavik, and in particular Alley's portrayal of her, resonated with fans. Alley declined to continue her participation in Star Trek and in the next two films Saavik was portrayed by Robin Curtis. (Several reasons for Alley declining to return have been suggested; Shatner's movie memoir, for example, suggests that Kirstie Alley's salary requests were at the root of her decision not to reprise her role.) Valeris in Star Trek VI was originally supposed to be Saavik, but Gene Roddenberry changed the character, in part, because it was noted that most fans would never have accepted that Saavik consciously betrayed the Federation. (Director Nicholas Meyer took exception to this, pointing out that he created the character of Saavik and knew her better than Roddenberry.)

 

In the original script, Dr. McCoy was apparently supposed to say his classic line, "He's dead, Jim" when Kirk attempts to reach Spock. According to an interview with DeForest Kelley, he requested that the line be dropped, concerned that the catch phrase would detract from the dramatic tension of the scene. The line was subsequently given to Scotty, as "Sir, he's dead already."

 

In the novelization by Vonda N. McIntyre, Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan (which was based on the shooting script for the movie), Saavik's heritage is revealed to be half-Romulan (this revelation was cut from the final film). In addition, Sulu is given the rank of Captain in the book, and is soon to command the USS Excelsior (deleted footage includes mention that Admiral Kirk had signed orders granting Sulu the captaincy of the Excelsior, however this was omitted from the final film, and the appearances of the vessel in later films do not reflect this original plot point, though Sulu is made a captain.)

 

The composer of the soundtrack James Horner makes a cameo appearance as a crew technician in an Enterprise corridor scene.

 

In popular culture

 

The term, "going Wrath of Khan on it" is an often used term in the film business regarding sequels. It basically means in a series of movies after the characters have been introduced in the first movie, the sequel will utilize the already established characters and make a second movie which will press their stories onward (and out of the initial introduction) in a more entertaining way, such as what The Wrath of Khan did with the Star Trek movie franchise. Director Bryan Singer has used this term in relation to Superman Returns and its sequel.

 

In the Seinfeld television series episode, "The Foundation," Jerry paraphrases a line from this film in an attempt to console the parents of George's late wife, Susan. As a result, Susan's parents founded a charitable organization in her honor and appoint George to sit on its board of directors, much to his dismay. The premise climaxes with George exclaiming "Khaaan!"

 

Khaaan.com is a website featuring a video clip of Kirk shouting "Khaaan!", complete with audio. The site is occasionally linked to on internet forums when expressing strong dismay in response to another post.

 

The commentary on the director's edition DVD for the film claims that the visual of the Genesis Device's impact on a barren planet is the first CGI effect ever used in a movie, although in truth, Futureworld was actually the first, using pioneering 3D graphics to animate a hand and face almost six years earlier. The Wrath of Khan was released in the United States 35 days before the release of Walt Disney Pictures' CGI-intensive Tron , released on July 9, 1982. Pixar, which at the time was a division of Industrial Light and Magic contributed to both films.

 

The Wrath of Khan was the first movie to use fractals to generate the special effects. The visual showing the Genesis Device's impact on a barren planet uses fractal geometry to generate the planet surface. The use of fractals would be revisited in Star Trek: First Contact where Data is ordered by Picard to lock out the main computer, in which Data uses a fractal encryption code which the Borg would be highly unlikely to break.

The opening to "Kill Bill Vol. 1" starts with the Klingon proverb Khan recites in this film: "Revenge is a dish best served cold".

 

In the song "Grade 9" by the Barenaked Ladies, they mention Wrath of Khan.

 

In an episode of The Critic, William Shatner is shown as the host of a fictional television show called Celebrity 911. He says that the episode will focus on actor James Caan, twitches for a moment, then yells "CAAAAAAAN!".

 

In The Daily Show, Jon Stewart often yells "Khaaan!" when exasperated.

 

On the Robot Chicken episode "Deep End", a 80s sitcom called Two Kirks, A Khan, and A Pizza Place is featured, starring Kirk Cameron, Admiral Kirk and Khan. While working the register, Khan spills a soft drink, leading Kirk to bellowing Khan's name with a dramatic surge of music.

 

In the Futurama episode Where No Fan Has Gone Before, the alien entity Melllvar calls a Star Trek trivia contest. One of the questions asked is "Who did the captain maroon on Ceti Alpha V?", to which William Shatner jumps out of his seat and yells "KHAN!!!!".

 

A minor time-inaccuracy appears in the film. During their initial confrontation, Khan disables the Enterprise and gives Kirk 60 seconds to hand over classified information about Project Genesis. In reality, 2 minutes and 4 seconds pass before Khan informs Kirk that his time is up. Khan gives 45 and 15 second warnings at 26 seconds and 1 minute 32 seconds respectively.

 

This entry is from Wikipedia. This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. It uses material from the Wikipedia article "Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan".

Edited by trekz

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I think that it's the best of the TOS Crew's Movies.

 

I never get sick of seeing it.

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